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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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image: Hormone Released by Bone Suppresses Appetite

Hormone Released by Bone Suppresses Appetite

By | March 8, 2017

A protein secreted by osteoblasts crosses the blood-brain barrier to regulate hunger in mice.

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image: Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers examine the firing patterns of interneurons throughout all layers of the somatosensory cortices of alert mice.  

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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image: How Much Do Sex Differences Matter in Mouse Studies?

How Much Do Sex Differences Matter in Mouse Studies?

By | February 24, 2017

Examining both male and female model organisms is worth the extra effort and added costs, most experts maintain, but whether the results translate to human studies is less clear.  

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image: Study: Zika Shrinks Testicular Tissue in Mice

Study: Zika Shrinks Testicular Tissue in Mice

By | February 23, 2017

The virus may persist in testes even after the infection is no longer detectable in blood, leading to sexual transmission of the disease and fertility impairments.

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image: Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation

By | February 16, 2017

Family members of Lacks, the donor behind the widely used HeLa cell line, are planning to sue Johns Hopkins University.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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