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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

By | April 11, 2017

These fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.

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image: Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

By | April 10, 2017

Unlike related species, Ovatiovermis cribratus, a lobopodian from the Cambrian period, did not have a hard, protective shell.

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image: Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

By | March 24, 2017

An analysis of 74 dinosaur species leads a group of researchers to reorganize the extinct animals’ evolutionary history.

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