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image: Plastic Munching Plankton

Plastic Munching Plankton

By | August 16, 2017

This giant larvacean can ingest microplastic pollution and poop it down to the sea floor.

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Researchers show that pinkie-size marine organisms can ingest and poop out microplastics, potentially transporting them to the depths.

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image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

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image: Sea Spiders Breathe with Their Guts

Sea Spiders Breathe with Their Guts

By | July 10, 2017

These ocean-dwelling arthropods move oxygen through a digestive system in their legs.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Giant Shipworm

Image of the Day: Giant Shipworm

By | April 19, 2017

Kuphus polythalamia is a worm-like mollusk that can reach up to 155 cm in length, is encased in a hard, tusk-like shell, and lives in sulfur-rich mud.

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