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image: Image of the Day: No Table Manners

Image of the Day: No Table Manners

By | August 24, 2017

Ancient bones of the newly described toothless, stout-nosed dolphin Inermorostrum xenops suggest that it slurped its food.

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image: Image of the Day: Whale Watching

Image of the Day: Whale Watching

By | March 8, 2017

Scientists capture the True’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) on film for the first time.

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: “Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

“Waviness” Protects Nerves When Whale Mouths Stretch

By | February 21, 2017

Rorqual whales’ mouths can stretch to more than double their length without causing damage, thanks to two layers of neuronal coiling. 

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

By | March 18, 2014

Emerging evidence suggests that the marine mammal’s long front tooth might help the narwhal sense environmental changes.  

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