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image: Getting the Word Out

Getting the Word Out

By | February 1, 2016

In a shifting media landscape with a growing public interest in science, some researchers are doing their own PR.

2 Comments

image: Making a Case for Social Media

Making a Case for Social Media

By | September 11, 2013

Twitter can help scientists build networks, develop ideas, and spread their work, report says.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

By | July 2, 2013

The lines between scholarly and traditional forms of popular communication are fading, and scientists need to take advantage.

0 Comments

image: Gov’t Science and the Media

Gov’t Science and the Media

By | March 15, 2013

Federal research agencies, such as the NIH, EPA, and NSF, are improving communication between their scientists and journalists, but most can do better.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Scientists’ Intuitive Failures

Opinion: Scientists’ Intuitive Failures

By | July 23, 2012

Much of what researchers believe about the public and effective communication is wrong.

26 Comments

image: Gulf Oil Spill Failings

Gulf Oil Spill Failings

By | April 24, 2012

A marine scientist ponders how academics could have handled the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill better.

4 Comments

image: Canadian Scientists “Muzzled”

Canadian Scientists “Muzzled”

By | February 21, 2012

Governmental red tape blocks scientists from discussing their research with journalists, according to an open letter.

2 Comments

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