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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

Immune Cell–Stem Cell Cooperation

By , and | July 1, 2016

Understanding interactions between the immune system and stem cells could pave the way for successful stem cell–based regenerative therapies.

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image: Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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