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image: RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

By | April 17, 2017

A recent CRISPR study contradicted years of RNA interference research on a well-studied cancer drug target. But is it the last nail in the coffin for RNAi as a screening tool? 

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image: A Walk on the Wild Side

A Walk on the Wild Side

By | February 1, 2017

Plants have so much to teach us.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Metazoans in the DNAi Club

Metazoans in the DNAi Club

By | July 1, 2015

A chance discovery results in the first report of DNA-based gene silencing in an animal.

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image: Ebola Drug Trial Terminated

Ebola Drug Trial Terminated

By | June 23, 2015

Early analysis of TKM-Ebola-Guinea offers discouraging results, causing sponsors to end the Phase 2 trial.

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image: Improving Crops with RNAi

Improving Crops with RNAi

By | June 1, 2015

RNA interference is proving to be a valuable tool for agriculture, allowing researchers to develop pathogen-resistant and more-nutritious crops.

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image: The Second Coming of RNAi

The Second Coming of RNAi

By | September 1, 2014

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

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image: Karmella Haynes: Turning the Dials

Karmella Haynes: Turning the Dials

By | December 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University. Age: 36

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