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Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.

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image: Amazonian Reef

Amazonian Reef

By | July 1, 2016

See footage from the expedition that discovered a coral reef hiding beneath the massive muddy plume at the mouth of the Amazon River.

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image: Long-Distance Calls

Long-Distance Calls

By | July 1, 2016

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute researcher Peter Tyack expresses the beauty of marine mammal communication.

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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