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image: Image of the Day: Electric Fish

Image of the Day: Electric Fish

By | March 7, 2017

The little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) uses its specialized electrosensory organ to detect electrical fields produced by its prey.

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image: Seal Whiskers Can Detect Weak Water Currents

Seal Whiskers Can Detect Weak Water Currents

By | January 18, 2017

The marine predators may use the mechanosensory hairs to detect fish that are hiding motionless on the seafloor.

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Certain microbes express genes in a methane-production pathway, offering an explanation for puzzlingly high levels of the gas in some lakes.

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image: Seals Help Oceanographers Explore Underwater

Seals Help Oceanographers Explore Underwater

By | November 1, 2016

Data collected by elephant seals in Antarctic waters provide a closer look at the processes driving ocean circulation.

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Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.

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image: Amazonian Reef

Amazonian Reef

By | July 1, 2016

See footage from the expedition that discovered a coral reef hiding beneath the massive muddy plume at the mouth of the Amazon River.

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image: Long-Distance Calls

Long-Distance Calls

By | July 1, 2016

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute researcher Peter Tyack expresses the beauty of marine mammal communication.

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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