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Representatives follow the lead of senators in drafting a bill that would encourage federal scientists to share data.

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Attorneys representing pathologist Fazlul Sarkar and users of the post-publication peer review website present their cases regarding the constitutionality of subpoenaing for the identities of anonymous commenters.

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The embattled stem cell researcher faces a new investigation exploring his culpability in the deaths of two patients he treated.

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image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.

2 Comments

image: Australian Court Upholds Patents on Human Genes

Australian Court Upholds Patents on Human Genes

By | September 8, 2014

The Federal Court of Australia rejected an appeal of a ruling that allows companies to patent isolated human genes.

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A measure moving through the California legislature requires farmers to obtain a prescription to administer antibiotics to livestock.

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image: U.K. May Allow Mitochondrial Replacement

U.K. May Allow Mitochondrial Replacement

By | March 21, 2013

The country’s fertility regulator reported that the technique has “broad support.”

3 Comments

image: Memory Not Reliable, Court Says

Memory Not Reliable, Court Says

By | July 30, 2012

New Jersey judges are now required to explain to jurors that the human memory is prone to errors.

3 Comments

image: Academics Win Patent Rights

Academics Win Patent Rights

By | April 10, 2012

A judge says that government and university labs have to share the patent rights to the successful cancer drug Velcade.

4 Comments

image: Misconduct Hearing Granted

Misconduct Hearing Granted

By | March 9, 2012

A cancer researcher charged with scientific misconduct in 2011 may have the right to present his defense—a rare occurrence under current regulations.

12 Comments

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