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image: Brain Listens During Sleep

Brain Listens During Sleep

By | June 15, 2016

People continue to hear and process words during light non-REM sleep, a study shows.

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image: What’s in a Voice?

What’s in a Voice?

By | May 1, 2016

More than you think (or could make use of)

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image: Year in Review: Hot Topics

Year in Review: Hot Topics

By | December 21, 2015

In 2015, The Scientist dove deep into the latest research on aging, HIV, hearing, and obesity.

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image: New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

By | November 5, 2015

Deficiency in a protein called pejvakin makes inner ear cells more vulnerable to sound, unable to brace themselves against oxidative stress stimulated by noise. 

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image: Early Hominin Hearing

Early Hominin Hearing

By | September 29, 2015

Based on the structure of fossilized skulls and ear bones, researchers learn that early hominins heard sounds best between the frequencies that humans and chimpanzees do.

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image: Hearing Channel Components Mapped

Hearing Channel Components Mapped

By | September 4, 2015

Localization of two proteins important for inner ear hair cell function suggests they are part of the elusive mechanotransduction channel. 

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image: Mapping Corti

Mapping Corti

By | September 3, 2015

The inner ear organ, from macro to micro

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image: Dr. Hearing

Dr. Hearing

By | September 1, 2015

James Hudspeth talks brain processing and hearing in this video from Rockefeller University.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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image: Hearing Discrepancy Probed

Hearing Discrepancy Probed

By | September 1, 2015

Common in vitro experiments have distorted the true mechanics of mammalian hair cell stereocilia.

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