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image: Opinion: Life’s X Factor

Opinion: Life’s X Factor

By | August 4, 2015

Did endosymbiosis—and the innovations in membrane bioenergetics it engendered—make it possible for eukaryotic life to evolve?

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image: Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

By | May 6, 2015

Deep-sea microbes possess hallmarks of eukaryotic cells, hinting at a common ancestor for archaea and eukaryotes.

1 Comment

image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

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image: Newly ID’d Transposons Involve Cas

Newly ID’d Transposons Involve Cas

By | May 27, 2014

Researchers uncover a group of mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea encoding a Cas enzyme.

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image: Sequencing the Tree of Life

Sequencing the Tree of Life

By | April 24, 2014

Charting the progress of the various large-scale genome-sequencing projects as researchers working separately on their chosen species begin to pool analytical resources

7 Comments

image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Let There Be Life

Let There Be Life

By | March 1, 2014

How did Earth become biological?

2 Comments

image: Path Finding

Path Finding

By | March 1, 2014

Biochemistry reveals the missing link in a pathway that archaea and some bacteria use to generate essential compounds.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria Trade Genes

Bacteria Trade Genes

By | October 1, 2013

Extremophiles living in Antarctica’s salty Deep Lake exchange genes much more often than previously observed in nature.

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