The Scientist

» Archaea

Most Recent

Scientists expand the microbial tree of life by publishing more than 1,000 novel reference genomes.  

0 Comments

image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

2 Comments

image: Asgard Archaea Hint at Eukaryotic Origins

Asgard Archaea Hint at Eukaryotic Origins

By | January 18, 2017

A newly discovered superphylum of archaea may be related to a microbe that engulfed a bacterium to give rise to complex eukaryotic life.

0 Comments

image: New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

By | December 22, 2016

A metagenomics analysis finds Cas9 in archaea for the first time, along with two previously unknown Cas nucleases from bacteria.

1 Comment

image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

0 Comments

image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

0 Comments

image: Microbes Persist in Super-Salty Conditions

Microbes Persist in Super-Salty Conditions

By | June 23, 2016

Extremophiles can thrive on perchlorates and metabolize carbon monoxide, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Life’s X Factor

Opinion: Life’s X Factor

By | August 4, 2015

Did endosymbiosis—and the innovations in membrane bioenergetics it engendered—make it possible for eukaryotic life to evolve?

1 Comment

image: Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

By | May 6, 2015

Deep-sea microbes possess hallmarks of eukaryotic cells, hinting at a common ancestor for archaea and eukaryotes.

1 Comment

image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS