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image: Chameleons Catch Prey with Sticky Spit

Chameleons Catch Prey with Sticky Spit

By | June 22, 2016

The lizard’s saliva is thick enough to drag a cricket to its alimentary demise, scientists show.

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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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image: Butterflies Weaponize Milkweed Toxins

Butterflies Weaponize Milkweed Toxins

By | November 4, 2015

Monarch and queen caterpillars store toxic compounds from their milkweed diet to ward off predators into adulthood, a new study suggests.

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image: The Sea Hare’s Chemical Attack

The Sea Hare’s Chemical Attack

By | March 29, 2013

The slug-like marine animals squirt a substance at lobsters that makes the predators lose their ability to smell.

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image: Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

By | January 10, 2013

Bamboo sharks still developing in their egg cases respond to a predator presence by ceasing movement and even breathing.

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image: Mites Remember Enemies, Fight Back

Mites Remember Enemies, Fight Back

By | October 12, 2012

Mites that were attacked by rival species as juveniles attack the young of their former assailants more frequently when they reach adulthood.

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image: Archaean Prey

Archaean Prey

By | March 13, 2012

Animals can and do eat Archaea.

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