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image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.

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image: Electric Microbe Hairs

Electric Microbe Hairs

By | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

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image: Electron Shuffle

Electron Shuffle

By | May 1, 2013

Shewanella bacteria generate energy for survival by transporting electrons to nearby mineral surfaces.

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image: Live Wires

Live Wires

By | May 1, 2013

Discoveries of microbial communities that transfer electrons between cells and across relatively long distances are launching a new field of microbiology.

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image: Bacterial-Mineral Electrical Grids

Bacterial-Mineral Electrical Grids

By | June 4, 2012

Different microbe species can cooperate via electric currents, with the help of conductive minerals in the sediment.

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image: Next Generation: A Molecular Camera

Next Generation: A Molecular Camera

By | March 14, 2012

Knocking electrons out of atomic orbit with a laser allows researchers to take femtosecond-scale “movies” of molecules in motion.

6 Comments

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