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» gut microbiota and ecology

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image: Microbiota Mismatch

Microbiota Mismatch

By | May 21, 2015

The giant panda’s gut microbiome resembles that of a carnivorous animal despite its diet.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

By | April 16, 2015

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

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image: Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

By | April 13, 2015

A breast milk-associated gene mutation impacts the establishment of a newborn’s gut microbiome, a study suggests.

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image: Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

By | March 10, 2015

Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Food Additives Linked to Inflammation

Food Additives Linked to Inflammation

By | February 27, 2015

Commonly added to processed foods, emulsifiers are associated with changes in gut microbiome composition and increased inflammation in mice.

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image: Antibiotic Boosts Parasitic Infection

Antibiotic Boosts Parasitic Infection

By | January 22, 2015

Mosquitoes that consume penicillin and streptomycin-laced blood pick up malaria more easily.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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