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image: Why Obese Mice Prefer To Sit Around All Day

Why Obese Mice Prefer To Sit Around All Day

By | January 3, 2017

A study links excess body weight in the rodents with dopamine receptor inactivity and reduced movement.

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image: Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

Study: Enriched Housing Changes Murine T Cells

By | October 3, 2016

Mice that live in a more-stimulating environment for two weeks appear to develop a more-inflammatory immune state that might help protect the animals against infection. 

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image: Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice

Immune Defect Detected in Knockout Mice

By | May 20, 2016

Researchers have identified a mutation in a commonly used commercial mouse strain that could impact experimental results.

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image: Drug Spurs Digestion

Drug Spurs Digestion

By | January 6, 2015

A new drug shows promise as a weight-loss solution in mice, prompting the animals to burn calories in the absence of a meal.

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image: May the Best Rodent Win

May the Best Rodent Win

By | January 1, 2015

Are mice, considered by some to be the less intelligent rodent, edging out rats as laboratory models of decision making?

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image: Upside of Early-Life Stress?

Upside of Early-Life Stress?

By | November 18, 2014

Mice raised under stressful conditions are more adaptable as adults—and may pass this trait on to their pups.

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image: To Kill a Lab Rat

To Kill a Lab Rat

By | November 4, 2014

Some institutions are changing their protocols for rodent euthanasia, as research finds there may be more humane methods.

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image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

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image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Blood Protein as Youth Rejuvenator

Blood Protein as Youth Rejuvenator

By | May 6, 2014

Researchers identify a component of young mouse blood that can help repair damaged brains and muscles in older mice.

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