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BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences

The Scientist

» cancer, microbiology and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Illuminating a Cancer’s Origins

Illuminating a Cancer’s Origins

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers have developed a technique to visualize the origin of melanoma in zebrafish, throwing light on a genetic switch for cancer.

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Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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