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image: Image of the Day: Sun Burn

Image of the Day: Sun Burn

By | October 20, 2017

When certain melanocyte stem cells are exposed to UV rays, a molecular cascade can trigger melanoma, scientists find in mice.

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image: FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

By | October 19, 2017

The therapy, produced by Kite Pharma and owned by Gilead Sciences, is approved for use against some types of large B-cell lymphomas. 

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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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image: Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000

Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000

By | October 16, 2017

An analysis of contaminated literature finds that tens of thousands of papers used cell lines of questionable origins—and these were in turn cited by hundreds of thousands of other papers.

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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image: Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

By | October 12, 2017

Researchers identified genes related to melanin levels in African populations.

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.

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