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image: Immunotherapy Promising for Diabetes: Study

Immunotherapy Promising for Diabetes: Study

By | August 9, 2017

A small clinical trial demonstrates that peptide immunotherapy can halt the progression of early-stage type 1 diabetes.

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Mouse organoids reveal that a protein active during embryonic development joins forces with gene enhancers to revert cancer cells to an earlier developmental state.

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image: Image of the Day: Over the Islet Rainbow

Image of the Day: Over the Islet Rainbow

By | June 13, 2017

Scientists have constructed three-dimensional maps depicting the size and location of insulin-producing islet cells in the mouse pancreas.

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The diabetic volunteer continued to produce insulin one year after she received a transplant of abdominal islet cells.

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image: Chimeric Pancreas Treats Diabetes in Mice

Chimeric Pancreas Treats Diabetes in Mice

By | January 26, 2017

Researchers produce functional organs composed of both mouse and rat cells.

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image: How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

By | July 1, 2016

Lipids and insulin play important roles in blood sugar regulation, and altered levels of either could kick start metabolic dysfunction.

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image: Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

Insulin-Producing Mini Stomachs

By | February 22, 2016

Scientists grow gastric organs in vitro that can restore insulin production when transplanted into mice.

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image: Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

Lab-Made Insulin-Secreting Cells

By | October 13, 2014

Researchers craft hormone-producing pancreas cells from human embryonic stem cells, paving the way for a cell therapy to treat diabetes.

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image: Transformer Cells in Diabetes

Transformer Cells in Diabetes

By | September 13, 2012

In diabetic mice, the cells of the pancreas don’t die, but rather revert to an earlier state incapable of producing the insulin the body needs.

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image: The Dark Side of Working Nights

The Dark Side of Working Nights

By | April 11, 2012

Pulling frequent all-nighters, experiencing jet lag, and working night shifts can lead to diabetes in more than one way.

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