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image: TS Picks: June 15, 2015

TS Picks: June 15, 2015

By | June 15, 2015

Memory-based dietary assessments; organs-on-a-chip; scientists in Italy accused of spreading plant pathogen


image: Growing Human Guts in Mice

Growing Human Guts in Mice

By | January 12, 2015

Researchers make more progress toward growing human intestines in mice, paving the way for better models of intestinal function and failure.


image: Stem-Cell Scientist Dies

Stem-Cell Scientist Dies

By | August 5, 2014

Yoshiki Sasai, a prominent organogenesis researcher who was a coauthor on two retracted stem cell studies, has died of apparent suicide at 52, officials say.

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image: Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

Rats Receive Lab-Grown Esophagi

By | April 16, 2014

Researchers successfully transplant engineered esophagi into living rats.


image: Lab-Grown Kidney Buds

Lab-Grown Kidney Buds

By | November 19, 2013

Using human stem cells, investigators from the U.S. and Spain generate functional ureteric buds.


image: Opinion: I Want My Kidney

Opinion: I Want My Kidney

By | November 7, 2013

With the advent of xenotransplantation, tissues made from cell-seeded scaffolds, and 3-D-printing, custom-made organs must be right around the corner.


image: Week in Review: September 30–October 4

Week in Review: September 30–October 4

By | October 4, 2013

Scientists feel the shutdown’s sting; dogs comprehend human cues; lab-grown secretory glands; whether online comments help or hurt science


image: Replacement Secretory Glands

Replacement Secretory Glands

By | October 1, 2013

Researchers have engineered functional, lab-grown precursors to salivary and tear glands, successfully connecting them to ducts and nerves in mice.


Associate Professor, Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 45


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