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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Repositioning Ctenophores

Repositioning Ctenophores

By | December 1, 2015

A reanalysis of phylogenetic data places sponges, rather than comb jellies, back at the base of the animal tree.

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image: Tree of Life v1.0

Tree of Life v1.0

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers map 2.3 million species in a single phylogeny. 

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image: New Species Galore

New Species Galore

By | December 27, 2014

A look back at the latest microbes, plants, and animals to have secured a spot in science’s known tree of life in 2014

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image: Week in Review: April 21–25

Week in Review: April 21–25

By | April 25, 2014

Evolution of Y chromosome; delivering gene with “bionic ears”; diversity of an important cyanobacterium; charting genome-sequencing progress; blockbuster pharma deals

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image: Sequencing the Tree of Life

Sequencing the Tree of Life

By | April 24, 2014

Charting the progress of the various large-scale genome-sequencing projects as researchers working separately on their chosen species begin to pool analytical resources

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image: Ancient Life in the Information Age

Ancient Life in the Information Age

By | March 1, 2014

What can bioinformatics and systems biology tell us about the ancestor of all living things?

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image: Let There Be Life

Let There Be Life

By | March 1, 2014

How did Earth become biological?

2 Comments

image: Genomenclature?

Genomenclature?

By | February 24, 2014

Researchers propose a naming system based on genomic information for all Earth’s life.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

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