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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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image: Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

Inflammation Drives Gut Bacteria Evolution

By | March 16, 2017

Viruses within Salmonella rapidly spread genes throughout the bacterial population during a gut infection, scientists show.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 16, 2017

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Image of the Day: Electric Fish

Image of the Day: Electric Fish

By | March 7, 2017

The little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) uses its specialized electrosensory organ to detect electrical fields produced by its prey.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers examine the firing patterns of interneurons throughout all layers of the somatosensory cortices of alert mice.  

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image: Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

Tune Into the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

A survey of sounds from birds to whales to fruit flies to fish

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image: Song Around the Animal Kingdom

Song Around the Animal Kingdom

By | March 1, 2017

Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

How Bacteria Interfere with Insect Reproduction

By | February 28, 2017

Scientists identify the genes responsible for bacteria-controlled sterility in arthropods.

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