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image: Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

By | June 1, 2017

Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.

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image: How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

By | May 22, 2017

Transcript abundance isn’t a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies’ suggestions. 

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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image: Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor

Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor

By | April 1, 2017

Analyzing single cell sequences to decipher the evolution of a tumor

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image: Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

By | November 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Bates College. Age: 37

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image: Learning Bioinformatics

Learning Bioinformatics

By | July 1, 2016

In today’s data-heavy research environment, wet-lab scientists can benefit from new computational skills.

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image: Computer Science Pioneer Dies

Computer Science Pioneer Dies

By | August 21, 2015

John Henry Holland, who developed genetic algorithms, has passed away. He was 86.

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image: The Living Set

The Living Set

By | June 1, 2015

Mathematical and computational approaches are making strides in understanding how life might have emerged and organized itself from the basic chemistry of early Earth.

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image: Beneficial Stats

Beneficial Stats

By | March 1, 2015

Statisticians who normally crunch numbers to forecast trends in the food-service industry turn their attention to bettering treatment of ALS.

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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