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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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image: Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery

By | January 1, 2017

Researchers are using high-tech solutions to bring the lifecycle of the European eel into sharper focus.

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image: Q&A: Zika Damages Mouse Testes, Reduces Fertility

Q&A: Zika Damages Mouse Testes, Reduces Fertility

By | October 31, 2016

Michael Diamond of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and colleagues tracked the virus in the male mouse reproductive tract over several weeks.

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image: Why Female Orgasm Evolved

Why Female Orgasm Evolved

By | August 4, 2016

The phenomenon may have arisen to trigger hormonal surges and drive ovulation, scientists propose.

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image: Guppie Porn

Guppie Porn

By | August 1, 2016

Biologist Carin Bondar delivers a TED talk about the wilder side of sex.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Meiotic Mysteries

Meiotic Mysteries

By | May 1, 2016

Understanding why so many human oocytes contain the wrong number of chromosomes

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

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image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

1 Comment

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