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image: US and Cuban Researchers to Meet in Havana

US and Cuban Researchers to Meet in Havana

By | August 14, 2017

Rush Holt of AAAS talks with The Scientist about the upcoming gathering and collaborations—past, present, and future—between the two countries.

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image: North Korean Travel Ban Could Disrupt Studies

North Korean Travel Ban Could Disrupt Studies

By | July 24, 2017

Rare and hard-fought academic partnerships are left in limbo.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The cancer scientist and his family have been sent home, and an official claims that his detention was not triggered by the Trump travel ban.

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Policies that limit researchers’ travel could restrict scientific progress and partnerships.

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image: Supreme Court Reinstates Trump Travel Ban

Supreme Court Reinstates Trump Travel Ban

By | June 26, 2017

The judges’ decision allows exceptions that may permit scientists’ travel from the blocked countries.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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