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image: Sex in a Scanner

Sex in a Scanner

By | July 1, 2014

Meet Pek Van Andel, who conducted the famous MRI sex experiment, and see his research in action.

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image: Week in Review: March 31–April 4

Week in Review: March 31–April 4

By | April 4, 2014

Transcriptional landscape of the fetal brain; how a parasitic worm invades plants; difficulties reproducing “breakthrough” heart regeneration method; oxytocin and dishonesty

1 Comment

image: Review: “Please Continue”

Review: “Please Continue”

By | February 11, 2014

A play that dramatizes Stanley Milgram’s infamous social psychology experiments from the 1960s captures the personal side of human research.

4 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 29, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Understanding Cats

Understanding Cats

By | October 18, 2013

An anthrozoologist explores feline communication and cognition in an essay about domestic cats.

1 Comment

image: That New Baby Smell

That New Baby Smell

By | September 25, 2013

New moms’ brains show a stronger response to infant body odor than do the brains of women who aren’t mothers.

2 Comments

image: Money Troubles Tax the Brain

Money Troubles Tax the Brain

By | August 29, 2013

Financial concerns are tied to poorer performance on cognitive tasks.

1 Comment

image: Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

By | March 27, 2013

Researchers demonstrate that brain activity in response to a decision-making challenge predicts the likelihood that released prisoners will be re-arrested.

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image: The Reason for Wrinkled Fingers

The Reason for Wrinkled Fingers

By | January 10, 2013

Wrinkled skin on our fingers after long soaks in water may have made human ancestors more dexterous with aquatic tasks.

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image: Gaming with Autism

Gaming with Autism

By | January 1, 2013

Screen-based technologies show promise for autism intervention—but research is still needed to evaluate both the benefits and the possible negative effects.

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