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image: Nose Bacterium Inhibits <em>S. aureus</em> Growth

Nose Bacterium Inhibits S. aureus Growth

By | July 27, 2016

A study on microbe versus microbe battles within the human nose yields a new antibiotic.

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image: Antibiotics From Scratch

Antibiotics From Scratch

By | May 18, 2016

Scientists develop a method for synthesizing hundreds of new macrolide antibiotics.

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image: Antibiotic Assistants

Antibiotic Assistants

By | March 9, 2016

Scientists discover compounds that restore antibiotic efficacy against drug-resistant superbugs.  

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image: New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

By | January 7, 2015

Researchers have isolated a new kind of antibiotic from a previously unknown and uncultured bacterial genus.  

3 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: FDA Approves Another New Antibiotic

FDA Approves Another New Antibiotic

By | June 24, 2014

Second new drug to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus approved under US Food and Drug Administration incentive program. 

1 Comment

image: New Antibiotics to Combat Resistant Bugs

New Antibiotics to Combat Resistant Bugs

By | June 6, 2014

Two new drugs—one a single-dose antibiotic—have been developed to treat skin infections, including methicillin-reistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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image: Predicting MRSA Toxicity

Predicting MRSA Toxicity

By | April 10, 2014

A comparative genomic study shows that researchers can use genetic signatures to predict the toxicity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

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image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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image: Re-sensitizing Resistant Bacteria

Re-sensitizing Resistant Bacteria

By | May 2, 2013

Researchers use a protein-lipid complex found in human breast milk to increase the activity of otherwise-ineffective antibiotics against drug-resistant pathogens.

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