The Scientist

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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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image: Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

By | April 6, 2017

Our totally bogus case report swiftly passed muster, with only minor revisions requested.

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image: SCOPUS Dumps OMICS Journals

SCOPUS Dumps OMICS Journals

By | March 29, 2017

A database of scientific journal titles has removed several OMICS titles for “publication concerns.”

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

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image: US Gov't Takes On Predatory Publishers

US Gov't Takes On Predatory Publishers

By | August 29, 2016

The Federal Trade Commission has filed a legal complaint against the OMICS Group for allegedly engaging in deceptive practices.

1 Comment

image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Predatory Journal Trading on Former Name

Predatory Journal Trading on Former Name

By | August 26, 2014

Experimental & Clinical Cardiology, a once well-respected journal, now is publishing anything that comes with a payment of $1,200.

1 Comment

image: OMICS in Hot Water

OMICS in Hot Water

By | May 14, 2013

HHS tells an open-access publisher to stop using the NIH, the names of its employees, and its scientific literature databases in a “misleading manner.”

3 Comments

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