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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

1 Comment

image: Interdisciplinary Research Attracts Less Funding

Interdisciplinary Research Attracts Less Funding

By | June 29, 2016

An analysis of Australian Research Council data reveals grant proposals that integrate a broad array of academic fields are less likely to be funded.  

3 Comments

image: “Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

“Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

By | December 17, 2014

Australian researcher Donald Metcalf, whose discoveries transformed cancer treatment, has passed away at age 85.

0 Comments

image: Killer Jelly Found in Australian Waters

Killer Jelly Found in Australian Waters

By | August 11, 2014

The newly discovered species of Irukandji jellyfish can cause stroke and heart failure in humans it stings.

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image: Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

By | August 1, 2014

Zoologist John Gould undertook a financially risky expedition to document the birds of Australia—and found some unique mammals in a perilous situation.

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image: Australia Officially Debunks Homeopathy

Australia Officially Debunks Homeopathy

By | April 14, 2014

Government researchers conclude that homeopathic therapies do not work.

14 Comments

image: New ID for Dingoes

New ID for Dingoes

By | April 2, 2014

Once thought to be feral dogs, dingoes are actually a separate taxon from their domesticated relatives.

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image: New Species of Randy Marsupials Discovered

New Species of Randy Marsupials Discovered

By | February 21, 2014

Researchers have identified three new Australian marsupial species, males of which fornicate until they keel over.

0 Comments

image: Huge Mystery Jellyfish Washes Ashore

Huge Mystery Jellyfish Washes Ashore

By | February 7, 2014

Found by a family combing a beach in Tasmania, the giant invertebrate is new to science.

0 Comments

image: Green Gold

Green Gold

By | January 1, 2014

It’s been decades since researchers confirmed the presence of gold in plants, but biogeochemical prospecting has yet to catch on.

1 Comment

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