The Scientist

» climate change and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

0 Comments

Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

0 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

1 Comment

Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

0 Comments

image: Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

By | August 22, 2016

Zebra finches sing a special song that appears to help their offspring better adapt to a hotter climate, according to a study.

0 Comments

Science advocacy organizations have drafted a list of 20 questions for Hillary Clinton, Gary Johnson, Jill Stein, and Donald Trump; will post responses as they roll in.

0 Comments

image: <em>Vibrio</em> Infections On the Rise

Vibrio Infections On the Rise

By | August 9, 2016

Increases in oceanic populations of these bacteria—both pathogenic and not—is an effect of climate change, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

By | August 3, 2016

On remote island near Alaska, salt water intrusion and a warming climate killed off the last remaining survivors of the species.

0 Comments

image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

5 Comments

image: Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

Ocean Acidification Affects Fish Spawning

By | July 26, 2016

Researchers report the first evidence that acidified waters alter the ocellated wrasse’s reproductive behavior in the wild.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech