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image: Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

By | May 23, 2017

Tests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.

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SP140, an epigenetic reader protein mutated in a number of autoimmune disorders, is essential for macrophage function and preventing intestinal inflammation, scientists show. 

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image: Worm Infection Can Improve Gut Health: Study

Worm Infection Can Improve Gut Health: Study

By | April 14, 2016

Parasitic worms promote the growth of beneficial intestinal microbes in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

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image: Food Additives Linked to Inflammation

Food Additives Linked to Inflammation

By | February 27, 2015

Commonly added to processed foods, emulsifiers are associated with changes in gut microbiome composition and increased inflammation in mice.

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image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

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image: Heat Waves May Promote IBD Flares

Heat Waves May Promote IBD Flares

By | August 13, 2013

Higher temperatures are associated with an uptick in inflammatory bowel disease-related hospital admissions.

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image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

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image: Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

By | August 17, 2012

Mice with inflammatory bowel disease harbor gut bacteria that damage host DNA, predisposing mice to cancer.

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