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image: The RNA Age: A Primer

The RNA Age: A Primer

By | May 11, 2017

Our guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.

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Removing a specific miRNA from stem cells may induce the expression of endogenous retroviruses that enable the cells to form extra-embryonic lineages.

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image: Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

Tumor-Shrinking Triple-Helices

By | April 1, 2016

A braided structure and some adhesive hydrogel make therapeutic microRNAs both stable and sticky.

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image: Tools for Drools

Tools for Drools

By | July 1, 2015

A general guide to collecting and processing saliva

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Reducing Gene Therapy-Related Risk

Reducing Gene Therapy-Related Risk

By | January 22, 2015

In a mouse model of a rare disease, scientists have figured out how to reduce the elevated cancer risk tied to a gene therapy treatment.

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