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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

Nuclear Pores Come into Sharper Focus

By and | December 1, 2016

Solving a long-standing structural puzzle will open the door to understanding one of the cell’s most enigmatic machines.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

Putting the Pee in Pluripotency

By | April 1, 2016

One man’s waste is another man’s treasure trove of stem cells.

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image: “Celldance” Selections

“Celldance” Selections

By | December 14, 2015

Highlights from the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2015 video grant competition

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image: Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Neuron nurseries in the adult brains of rodents and humans appear to influence cognitive function.

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image: Targeted ER Breakdown

Targeted ER Breakdown

By | June 17, 2015

Researchers identify receptors that target the endoplasmic reticulum for degradation by autophagy in yeast and mice. 

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image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

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