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image: Ocean Viruses Cataloged

Ocean Viruses Cataloged

By | September 21, 2016

An international research team triples the number of known virus types found in marine environments. 

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Policymakers’ choice of seawater intakes highlights California’s troubling embrace of unproven technologies.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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image: A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

By | September 1, 2016

An indigenous community in northeastern India is a crucial part of the effort to save these majestic forest birds from extinction.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2016 issue of The Scientist

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: Proprioceptive Receptors

Proprioceptive Receptors

By and | September 1, 2016

Feedback from muscle spindles and tendon organs provides information about where our bodies are in space and whether or not they are moving.

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image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

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image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

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