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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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image: Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

By | September 13, 2017

Bacterial strains in mice’s gut microbiomes mediated their pups’ risk for developing abnormal behaviors.

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Exposure to the body’s humidity causes a film of the microbes to change shape, opening flaps in the garment to allow for increased airflow.

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image: Brain Bugs

Brain Bugs

By | September 1, 2017

Neuropharmacologist John Cryan of University College of Cork in Ireland explains the links between the microbiome and the central nervous system.

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