The Scientist

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image: Image of the Day: Social Drinking

Image of the Day: Social Drinking

By | April 28, 2017

Drunken crayfish will roll on their backs and enthusiastically perform tail flips in their tanks. The animals are more likely to display they behaviors after spending time in a social environment compared with an isolated one.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 27, 2017

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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