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image: Image of the Day: Reunited and It Feels So Good

Image of the Day: Reunited and It Feels So Good

By | July 28, 2017

Zebrafish have a remarkable ability to heal their damaged nerve fibers following a spinal injury.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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image: “Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

“Ghost Fibers” Help Heal Muscle Injury

By | December 15, 2015

Injured muscle cells leave behind organized collagen fibers that act as scaffolding for new tissue growth.

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image: Brain Freeze

Brain Freeze

By | October 1, 2015

A common tissue fixation method distorts the true neuronal landscape.

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image: Pointed Science

Pointed Science

By | May 1, 2013

University of Vermont neurologist Helene Langevin explains some emerging research attempting to explain the benefits of acupuncture.

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image: The Science of Acupuncture

The Science of Acupuncture

By | May 1, 2013

Research is uncovering connective tissue's role in the benefits of the ancient practice.

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image: The Science of Stretch

The Science of Stretch

By | May 1, 2013

The study of connective tissue is shedding light on pain and providing new explanations for alternative medicine.

19 Comments

image: (Re)Programming Director

(Re)Programming Director

By | October 1, 2012

Unwilling to accept the finality of terminal differentiation, Helen Blau has honed techniques that showcase the flexibility of cells to adopt different identities.

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