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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

By | October 1, 2016

From confocal fluorescence microscopy to super-resolution and live 3-D imaging, microscopes have changed rapidly since 1986.

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image: Seeing Inside Cells

Seeing Inside Cells

By | December 9, 2014

With super-resolution microscopy

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image: High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

High-Speed Intracellular Imaging

By | October 23, 2014

A new kind of microscopy uses a lattice of light to visualize biological processes with extraordinary spatial and temporal resolution.

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image: Fish Brain on Film

Fish Brain on Film

By | March 19, 2013

Improvements in light-sheet microscopy enable real-time activity imaging of almost every neuron in the brain of zebrafish larvae.

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image: The Sharper Image

The Sharper Image

By | October 1, 2012

Advances in light microscopy allow the mapping of cell migration during embryogenesis and capture dynamic processes at the cellular level.

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