The Scientist

» embryo

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Green Eggs 

Image of the Day: Green Eggs 

By | May 19, 2017

Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) embryos are tinted green by the oxygen-producing algae (Oophila amblystomatis) that grow inside.

0 Comments

The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

0 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

image: Image of the Day: See-Through Embryos

Image of the Day: See-Through Embryos

By | March 27, 2017

Scientists have created a high-resolution, 3-D atlas of human embryonic development during the first trimester of gestation.

2 Comments

Scientists issue a call to reconsider the rules governing the creation of tissues, organs, and other structures made possible by recent advances in synthetic biology. 

0 Comments

Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

0 Comments

image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

0 Comments

image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

image: Human Embryos Genetically Edited Again

Human Embryos Genetically Edited Again

By | April 11, 2016

For the second time, researchers use CRISPR to modify the genomes of nonviable embryos.

0 Comments

image: NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos

NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos

By | April 30, 2015

Following the publication of a study in which scientists used CRISPR to edit nonviable human embryos, the National Institutes of Health states it will not fund such research.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS