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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

2 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: How Caffeine Affects the Body Clock

How Caffeine Affects the Body Clock

By | September 16, 2015

Evening consumption of the drug leads human circadian rhythms to lag.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2014

Proof, Caffeinated, A Sting in the Tale, and The Insect Cookbook

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image: Caffeine Boosts Memory Consolidation?

Caffeine Boosts Memory Consolidation?

By | January 13, 2014

A new study purports to show that post-learning caffeine consumption can improve memory, but some scientists are not convinced.

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image: Killer Cups?

Killer Cups?

By | August 16, 2013

Heavy coffee drinkers under 55 are more likely to die sooner, a study shows.

8 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | March 11, 2013

The pollinators are more likely to recall flowers that offer them a caffeine reward.

2 Comments

image: Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

By | January 26, 2012

Moderate caffeine intake is associated with higher estrogen levels for Asians, but lower levels for whites.

6 Comments

image: How Caffeine Fights Cancer

How Caffeine Fights Cancer

By | August 15, 2011

Caffeinated drinks may help prevent skin cancer by inhibiting a DNA repair pathway, thus killing potentially precancerous cells.

12 Comments

image: Bacteria live on caffeine

Bacteria live on caffeine

By | June 10, 2011

Researchers discover that some bugs crave the buzz of caffeine.

0 Comments

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