The Scientist

» pollution and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

0 Comments

image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

0 Comments

The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Plastic Pollution

Infographic: Plastic Pollution

By | June 1, 2017

Both macroplastic items, such as bags, bottles, and other packaging, and products containing micro- and nanoplastic particles—from cosmetics to paints—contaminate the Earth’s ecosystems.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

0 Comments

image: Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

By | June 1, 2017

Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.

2 Comments

image: How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

By | May 22, 2017

Transcript abundance isn’t a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies’ suggestions. 

0 Comments

image: The RNA Age: A Primer

The RNA Age: A Primer

By | May 11, 2017

Our guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.

8 Comments

Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot
  3. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  4. Was a Drop in CRISPR Firms’ Stock Warranted?
AAAS