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image: Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

By | September 26, 2014

In the latest development in trying to use Bacillus anthracis to kill cancer, researchers send “antibody mimics” inside tumor cells.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Pneumonia-Causing Bacteria Poke Holes in Heart

Pneumonia-Causing Bacteria Poke Holes in Heart

By | September 18, 2014

Microlesions in heart muscle may contribute to cardiac complications in elderly patients, a study shows.

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image: Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

Next Generation: Blood-Cleansing Device

By | September 14, 2014

An external device that mimics the structure of a spleen can cleanse the blood of rats with acute sepsis, ridding the fluid of pathogens and toxins.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: More Skeletons in Gov’t Lab Closets

More Skeletons in Gov’t Lab Closets

By | September 9, 2014

A search for long-forgotten pathogens at the US National Institutes of Health prompts the discovery of toxins and disease-causing agents.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

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