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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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Researchers have constructed prosthetic female reproductive organs and implanted them in mice, some of which conceived and gave birth to live young.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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image: Image of the Day: Faking it

Image of the Day: Faking it

By | February 9, 2017

Some female lampreys mate with multiple males, without releasing any eggs.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: Study: Mitotic Cells Can Reprogram Mouse Sperm

Study: Mitotic Cells Can Reprogram Mouse Sperm

By | September 13, 2016

Murine embryos undergoing first cell division can reprogram injected sperm and develop normally. 

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image: Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

Birds Warn Unborn Chicks About Warmer Weather

By | August 22, 2016

Zebra finches sing a special song that appears to help their offspring better adapt to a hotter climate, according to a study.

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image: Female Fish Select Mates’ Sperm

Female Fish Select Mates’ Sperm

By | August 17, 2016

A protective coating on ocellated wrasse eggs helps female fish select sperm from nest-building males.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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