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image: Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

By | May 26, 2017

Inducing activity in the zona incerta region of the brain prompts mice to gorge themselves.

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image: Smarty Genes

Smarty Genes

By | May 23, 2017

Scientists have identified 40 new genes linked to human intelligence.

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image: Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

Bacterial Photography Goes Technicolor

By | May 22, 2017

Genetically engineered "disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology.

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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

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image: Ancient Protein Helps <em>E. coli</em> Thwart Viral Attack

Ancient Protein Helps E. coli Thwart Viral Attack

By | May 9, 2017

When engineered to use a four-billion-year-old version of the protein thioredoxin, the bacteria can stall bacteriophage replication, a new study shows.

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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image: Myelin Basics

Myelin Basics

By | May 1, 2017

May Profilee Ben Barres of Stanford University discusses how understanding the basic biology of myelination could help patients with multiple sclerosis and other diseases.

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