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image: Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

Modified Yeast Tolerate Alcohol, Heat

By | October 2, 2014

Simple changes help yeast thrive in the presence of their own harmful byproducts and could boost biofuel production.

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image: One Case Closes, Another Opens

One Case Closes, Another Opens

By | September 29, 2014

Unsure of the origins of a rogue crop found on an Oregon farm, the US Department of Agriculture is following up on a second issue related to genetically engineered wheat.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

By | June 2, 2014

Researchers modify a heat-loving bacterium so it can produce biofuel from switchgrass directly, with no need for costly chemical and enzymatic treatments.

1 Comment

image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

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image: Rusty Waves of Grain

Rusty Waves of Grain

By | June 1, 2014

See how a ruinous fungus that attacks wheat wreaks its damage.

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image: Designer Livestock

Designer Livestock

By | June 1, 2014

New technologies will make it easier to manipulate animal genomes, but food products from genetically engineered animals face a long road to market.

3 Comments

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