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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By | April 5, 2017

Notable quotes from this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: Fat’s Influence on Cancer

Fat’s Influence on Cancer

By | April 3, 2017

Researchers at the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting discuss the roles of adipose tissue and inflammation in the growth and spread of tumors.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Politics of Cancer</em>

Book Excerpt from The Politics of Cancer

By | April 1, 2017

In Chapter 2, “Identifying the Culprits,” author Wendy Whitman Cobb describes how small-government, anti-regulation conservatism can hinder the fight against cancer.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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