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image: Lubcheco on Conservation

Lubcheco on Conservation

By | July 17, 2017

Former NOAA administrator and zoologist Jane Lunchenco discusses the importance of science in the face of climate change.

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image: Oceans’ Ambassador

Oceans’ Ambassador

By | July 17, 2017

Jane Lubchenco has embraced many roles: marine ecologist, science communicator, federal agency administrator, and sustainable fishing advocate.

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image: Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

By | July 11, 2017

Scientists describe the number of vertebrate species experiencing population declines as “biological annihilation.”

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image: Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

By and | July 11, 2017

Modeling gives insight to the critical role of streamflow conditions when assessing the concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds.  

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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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