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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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image: Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

Transgenic Mouse Illuminates Melanoma Metastasis

By | June 28, 2017

Glowing cells mark the routes of tumor spread by way of newly formed lymph vessels. 

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image: Cancer Studies Seem Replicable

Cancer Studies Seem Replicable

By | June 27, 2017

In the latest findings from the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, independent researchers achieve results that mirror those of two earlier papers.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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image: Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain

Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain

By | June 19, 2017

Neutrophils loaded with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel traverse the blood-brain barrier and kill residual cancer cells after tumor-resection surgery in mice.

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image: Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

By | June 12, 2017

Ned Sharpless currently leads the cancer center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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