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image: Anatomical Art

Anatomical Art

By | August 1, 2014

Through her Street Anatomy blog, medical illustrator Vanessa Ruiz has connected with a diverse array of arists who draw inspiration from the human body.

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image: Anatomy for Everybody

Anatomy for Everybody

By | August 1, 2014

Meet Vanessa Ruiz, the medical illustrator behind the popular art blog Street Anatomy.

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image: The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

By | November 1, 2013

Santiago Ramón y Cajal used a staining technique developed by Camillo Golgi to formulate the idea that the neuron is the basic unit of the nervous system.

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image: “Living Lectures”

“Living Lectures”

By | October 31, 2013

Massachusetts-based artist Danny Quirk uses latex body paint to bring anatomical structures to life.

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image: Dissection via Paintbrush

Dissection via Paintbrush

By | October 31, 2013

An artist uses latex body paint to bring anatomical structures to life.

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image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

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