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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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